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Accessibility

Accessibility

Making video accessible

Approximately 5% of people have disabling hearing loss, with an even higher percentage experiencing any form of hearing loss.

In light of the large amount of online video content, ensuring accessibility is one of captionme’s core goals.

Captions for accessibility

Whether you’re creating online video content, content for film or TV, you should ensure that your content is accessibile.

Accessibility can be achieved with captionme’s automatic captions, or provide 100% accurate captions for your audience with human-made captions.

Person sat at desk editing a video captioning

Do I need to provide video accessibility?

Governments are starting to enact accessibility legislation, such as the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the European Accessibility Act (EAA).

These laws form the bedrock for nurturing a culture that values accessibility and universally accessible digital environments.

Accessibility is a right

Accessibility in video and audio content is not just a ‘nice to have’, it’s being written into law to create a more inclusive, diverse and fair society.

Inclusivity

Accessible video and audio content ensures equal access to your content. This fosters inclusivity, allowing everyone access to participate in the conversation.

Education

Providing e-Learning and educational content with subtitles and captions provides equal opportunities and improve educational outcomes for students.

Improved user experience

A large percentage of people consume media now with captions and subtitles turned on, regardless of their abilities. Ensure your content is consumed and retained by all of your audience.

Increased audience reach

Reach a wider audience when you improve your video and audio accessibility. A diverse audience imrpoves engagement with your content and fosters a more inclusive brand.

Accessibility with captionme

Improve your video accessibility today, get in touch to discuss how captionme can help you.

Need more information about captioning?

FAQs

Young people are almost 4 times more likely to watch videos with captioning. Four out of five viewers aged 18-25 said they use subtitles all or part of the time. So, for video content to appeal to the widest audience, captions are an essential tool.

Closed captioning is text on screen in the form of subtitles, assisting the viewer by coordinating the text with audio and video, simultaneously.

Captions are a text version of the speech and other descriptive sounds providing simultaneous visual text on screen, as information needed to understand the content.

Closed captions are optional for the viewer, open captions always appear on screen and subtitles provide a translation into a different language to the one being spoken.

Closed captions appear on screen as a visual aid to the viewer. Subtitles are a translation into another language to the one being spoken on screen, another optional feature for the viewer.

Captions are added to video content in the background, as a separate text file to the video. The text file has time stamps that let the video read when to display them on screen.  

  • Sign in to YouTube Studio.
  • From the left-hand menu, select Subtitles.
  • Click the video that you’d like to edit.
  • Click ADD LANGUAGE and select the language of your caption file.
  • Under subtitles, click ADD.
  • Select Upload file.
  • Choose With timing.
  • Select Continue.
  • Choose a file to upload.
  • Select Save.

Captions are added to video content in the background, as a separate text file to the video. The text file has time stamps that let the video read when to display them on screen. 

Add what is being said, or what is being portrayed in the Instagram video or Instagram Reel. The more information you can put on screen to help people who are watching without audio or have issues with audio-visual

Captioning puts text on a visual display to provide the viewer with an interpretation of content with or without sound. 

Closed captioning is optional text on a visual display to provide the viewer with an interpretation of content with or without sound. 

You can either use burned in captions (open) or optional captions (closed captions) and/or subtitles. You can create any of these directly within Adobe Premiere Pro, or import from a third-party as a .vtt or .srt. Alternatively, create your captions from a transcript from a transcription service provider.

You can either make them yourself which is a time-consuming and laborious task, or you can outsource to a third-party captioning service like captionme.

 

To create captions in Premiere Pro yourself, create a transcript of your video. Edit the transcript in the Text panel and then use Create captions within Premiere Pro to add your captions to the Premiere Pro timeline. You can then adjust them like any other media using editing tools.

 

Alternatively, upload your completed video to captionme, and have an .srt or .vtt created that you can drop straight in to your Adobe Premiere timeline to manipulate as you wish.

 

For more information, visit Adobe’s help website or contact captionme today.

Captions benefit everyone, but they’re imperative for making video accessible to deaf and hard-of-hearing people. Within the U.S., 48 million people are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

Also, young people are almost 4 times more likely to watch videos with captioning. Four out of five viewers aged 18-25 said they use subtitles all or part of the time. So, for video content to appeal to the widest audience, captions are an essential tool.

Instagram says the addition of closed captions makes Instagram more accessible for users who are in the deaf and hard-of-hearing communities.

 

Closed captions for Instagram are also useful for users who would prefer to watch videos without sound. As captionme have discussed before, young people are almost 4 times more likely to watch videos with captioning. Four out of five viewers aged 18-25 said they use subtitles all or part of the time. So, for video content to appeal to the widest audience, captions are an essential tool.

Closed captioning can be moved to a number of positions on screen. The most commonly used location is bottom-centre, as the eyes are naturally drawn to reading downward, and being at the bottom, rarely interrupts what is happening on-screen. Captionme’s editing suite allows you to choose; however, as for some forms of content, on certain screen sizes or aspect ratios, central or at the top of the screen is preferable.

Remotely collaborate

For larger projects, invite teams to view, input or create!